Heritage & Cultural Travel in Africa

Royal Geographical Society’s Hidden Journeys London to Dar es Salaam Flight

August 6, 2012
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Download article as PDF Fly the length of Africa with the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)’s Hidden Journeys  The Hidden Journeys Project aims to enliven the flying experience and transform it into a fascinating exploration of the people, places and environments thousands of metres below by providing inspiring information to air travellers about the parts of the world they fly over (www.hiddenjourneys.co.uk).  The flight path from London to Dar es Salaam explores the fascinating cultures, physical landscapes and current political developments beneath this diverse flight path. This journey takes you across the tiny yet beautiful nation of Luxembourg and the striking landscapes of the Ligurian coast, before crossing the Mediterranean and traversing the length of Africa, eventually flying past Kilimanjaro […]

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Champion of The Kilimanjaro Forests: Sebastian Chuwa

March 22, 2012
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Download article as PDF Tanzania is at the vortex of the African tourist industry, positioned equidistant from everywhere, and packed with just about everything that anyone needs to see of Africa in a compact fortnight’s worth of travel. The integrity and standards of preservation of Tanzania’s national parks are almost unique in Africa, and with iconic names like Serengeti and Ngorongoro to pull in the crowds, the crowds come. The petit Kilimanjaro International Airport daily disgorges hundreds of visitors, each processed and divided up among the dozens of tour busses and safari Landcruisers lining up in the parking lot under the spreading red flamboyant trees. It is an industry that handles nearly 400 000 visitors a year, a major contributor […]

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Rourkes Drift and Isandlwana: Key sites of the Anglo Zulu War of 1879

January 1, 2012
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Download article as PDF Deep in the signature countryside of Zululand – undulating grassland punctuated by rubble crowned kopjies and shallow river valleys – lie two key sites in the mythology of the black/white struggle for Southern Africa. The Anglo/Zulu War in many respects was the beginning of the end of black independent monarchy in Southern Africa. It came about as a consequence of a number of factors, some political and some visceral, but all of which were defined by one simple defining principal.: the simple fact that an aggressive and expanding British Empire could not tolerate the existence alongside it of of an independent, militarily vigorous, politically cohesive and culturally intact black mass such as the Zulu. Whatever might […]

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Food & Wine in the Mother City of Cape Town

December 20, 2011
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This entry is part 8 of 8 in the series Heritage & Cultural Travel in Africa

Download article as PDF This entry is part 8 of 8 in the series Heritage & Cultural Travel in AfricaFine food and wine has been a tradition at the Cape since founding of the first European settlement In fact it was when the first administrator, Jan van Riebeeck, produced the very first recorded Cape wine, noted down as the year 1659. An extremely fertile industry was  founded at that moment that has been built over many generations into the celebrated wine industry and culture that defines the Cape region today. Integral to the recipe are the many cultures and ethnicities that merged at the Cape, some willingly, but many not, but all of which have contributed extraordinary diversity to the […]

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A quick look at South African music

December 20, 2011
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This entry is part 6 of 8 in the series Heritage & Cultural Travel in Africa

Download article as PDF This entry is part 6 of 8 in the series Heritage & Cultural Travel in AfricaThe taxonomy of the local South African music industry is divided most cleanly along the line of race South Africa’s social mindset is informed by race. While this is in fact true for all the countries of Africa that experienced permanent white settlement, South Africa was settled more comprehensively by Europeans over a very long period of time – several hundred years – which has left a deep imprint, a permanent population and a rich and developing culture. The sophistication of the South African music scene is owed to musicians of each race, and all the sub-divisions within these. The result […]

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The South African Festival and Music Scene

December 20, 2011
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This entry is part 7 of 8 in the series Heritage & Cultural Travel in Africa

Download article as PDF This entry is part 7 of 8 in the series Heritage & Cultural Travel in AfricaSplashy Fen Legend has it that two friends, Peter Ferraz and Bart Fokkens, were sitting around over a beer one evening in 1990, discussing the decline of the great music festivals of yore. Concluding that the moment had come to reverse this trend the two decided then and there to found a festival in the grand old tradition, and thus the Splashy Fen was born. For those of you not already making plans to drive, hitchhike or walk to Splashy Fen farm in the Drakensberg, then it is probably too late this year to catch the opening acts, but the festival […]

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